Grey Thanksgiving is becoming the new Black Friday

Jon Fisher, Staff Writer

Thanksgiving is a time for families to spend time with each other and give thanks for what they have. Turkey, stuffing, sweet potatoes and cranberry sauce fill the room as people reminisce of family events while they fill their stomachs endlessly.

Historically speaking, the first Thanksgiving occurred in 1621 as the pilgrims and puritans gathered together to a feast in Plymouth, current-day Massachusetts, to give thanks for surviving the long journey from England.

Currently, this holiday is celebrated on the fourth Thursday each November.

The Fisher family, for example, delves into a big helping of turkey, stuffing, sweet potatoes, macaroni and cheese, cranberry juice and a sizable dose of football on the holiday. Discussions of family affairs take place, especially the normal Christmas Day planning.

Turkey day is known for bringing families together in happiness and peace.

As of recent years however, Thanksgiving is turning into a holiday that seems to be in the way of a societal importance: Black Friday.

Spending money surrounds itself in holiday cheer, which takes away from the tradition known as Thanksgiving and its entire splendor.

“I believe that Black Friday used to be something fun for people to do on Friday, however in this day and age now Black Friday is turning into a shopping spree on thanksgiving,” said Tracie Fisher, mother and wife.

Mrs. Fisher did indeed work on Black Friday, but for Allstate Insurance. Some employees who are employed by various clothing stores, electronics, boutiques and shopping emporiums began working on the night of Thanksgiving and worked until seven p.m. the night of Black Friday.

An employee of Sears on Black Friday worked 20 straight hours, just to help the store be prepared for the “holiday” rush.

It is turning Thanksgiving into only the day before Black Friday. It creates the new term, “grey Thanksgiving.”

“When people who are employed at their stores should be with their families giving thanks for what they have, but rather they have to go and work because now people want to shop on Thursday and I think it’s a travesty,” said Mrs. Fisher.

Sales around more than 50% off pull in shoppers from all around the U.S. to vacate the homes at which a family gathering is taking place to line up in stores during the night hours and essentially claw at each other to grasp the latest technology at a cheaper price.

Robbie Fisher, high school student at Ambridge high school, feels the holiday is rushed, almost vacating Thanksgiving as a whole.

“Now I think that families are getting away from the fact that they are eating dinner. Even some people I know are eating dinner on Saturday night and going to Black Friday, said Fisher.

He continued, “They are completely overlooking Thursday as the holiday and making shopping the holiday as well as making dinner an afterthought.”

This current generation can be dubbed as materialistic and Black Friday only solidifies the theory.

The human race turns Thanksgiving into the night before Black Friday. If there were a concept such as Black Friday the day after Christmas, would society turn the holiday into a “night before” situation?

Family is a staple of the human condition, one thing that cannot be replaced. Richard Fisher, father and husband, agrees with his nephew and believes that Black Friday is ruining Thanksgiving entirely.

“Since the emergence of Black Friday as an annual event, it’s almost as if people can’t wait to get Thanksgiving, along with the festivities, visiting with family and friends over with so they can get to the finish line [at the mall]. That is known as Black Friday and it is a shame.”